Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.
Distinguished Professor
RESEARCH AREA
Nanoscience and Bioengineering
CONTACT INFO

Bartosz A. Grzybowski received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Yale U. in 1995 and earned his Ph.D. degree from Harvard U. in 2000. After that, the short bio for his career is as follows:

10/2000 – 7/2001, Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University
7/2001 – 8/2003, Director of Research, Vitae Pharmaceuticals and Associate of the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University
7/2002 – present, Chief Scientific Officer, ProChimia Surfaces, Ltd.
9/2003 – 8/2007, Assistant Professor, Northwestern University, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Department of Chemistry
9/2007 – 8/2009, Associate Professor, Northwestern University, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Department of Chemistry
7/2009 – present, President of GSI, L.L.C.
9/2009 – 8/2014, Director of the DoE Energy Frontier Research Center (Non-Equilibrium Energy Research Center, Northwestern University)
9/2009 – 12/2014, Full Professor, Kenneth Burgess Chair in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Systems’ Engineering, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Department of Chemistry
12/2014 – present, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST)
7/2015 – present, Group Leader, Center for Soft and Living Matter, Institute for Basic Science (IBS)
Research Summary
In one of our key projects, we focus on the assembly schemes that allow building macroscopic structures from nanoscopic building blocks. Since bridging more than six orders of magnitude that separate nano from macro is not an easy task, we have developed a hierarchical approach, in which metal nanoobjects are first assembled into intermediate aggregates ("supraspheres") that contain more than 90% w/w metal but but behave like sticky pieces of wax or Play-doh. These sticky supraspheres can then glue with one another upon light irradiation and can form macroscopic materials. Remarkably, these materials look like metals and conduct electricity but they behave like moldable plastics. They can contain one or more elements (e.g., Au/Ag, Au/Pt, Pt/Pd nanoalloys) and can be hardened at room temperature. No kidding. For more details, please see our recent paper in Science (Science, 316, 261, 2007). In another materials-oriented work, we use charged metal nanoparticles to form ultrathin coatings. Since we use electrostatic forces and not material-specific chemical ligation schemes, our coatings form on all kinds of materials, from plastics through glasses to semiconductors. These coatings not only have some intriguing optical properties (cf. picture below), but they also can be made bacteriostatic (i.e., they kill all kinds of bugs). The latter property drives our effort to use these coatings in implantable materials (especially, silicones) where sterility of the surface is required but is often compromised during implantation procedures.

Representative Publications
Enhancing crystal growth using polyelectrolyte solutions and shear flow
Jian-Ke Sun, Yaroslav I. Sobolev, Weiyi Zhang, Qiang Zhuang and Bartosz A. Grzybowski*, Nature, 2020, 579, 73.
Synthetic Connectivity, Emergence, and Self-Regeneration in the Network of Prebiotic Chemistry
Agnieszka Wołos, Rafał Roszak, Anna Zadło-Dobrowolska, Wiktor Beker, Barbara Mikulak-Klucznik, Grzegorz Spólnik, Mirosław Dygas, Sara Szymkuc*, and Bartosz A. Grzybowski*, Science, 2020, 369, 1584.
Minimal-uncertainty prediction of general drug-likeness based on Bayesian neural networks
Wiktor Beker, Agnieszka Wolos, Sara Szymkuc and Bartosz A. Grzybowski*, Nature Machine Intelligence, 2020, 2, 457.